‘Game Of Thrones’ Season 8 Episode 1’s ‘Beautiful Death’ Poster Features The Night King’s Message

It was when I attended the Game of Thrones Live Concert Experience featuring Ramin Djawadi in Belfast last year that I discovered the Beautiful Death art series by artist Robert Ball. I wanted a memento from the concert and the concert merchandise that caught my eye was a colorful poster featuring a dozen of artistic depictions of memorable death scenes from the first seven seasons of the HBO blockbuster series.

From the Business Insider, I learnt that the London-based illustrator has been producing an artwork after every GOT episode where there’s a key death sequence since Season 1, with HBO providing him via e-mail with the “quote from the week”, as well as the subject for the week’s “beautiful death”.

(WARNING: SPOILERS AHEAD FOR GAME OF THRONES’ SEASON 8 EPISODE 1 IF YOU HAVEN’T WATCH THE EPISODE.)

With the eighth and final season of Game of Thrones kicking off this month, Ball has released his first Beautiful Death poster which features the horrific death of young Ned Umber at Last Hearth in the premiere episode. You can see the beautifully illustrated poster below:

“It’s A Message From the Night King…”

The quote is uttered by Ser Beric Dondarrion after he set the dead Umber lad on fire when he resurrected as a wight while pinned onto a wall with a spiral of human limbs. Hence you can see the six-time born-again lightning lord (left centre) and Tormund Giantsbane (right centre) flanking the image of Ned Umber as it was them who found the young lord at Last Hearth. The Night King has his icy hands around the boy to show how he was used as a tool to relay a message to the living.

“Nothing Lasts…” – Varys

What’s worrying is that Ball has also drawn in Jon Snow and Daenerys Targaryen’s romantic moment by the waterfall except that the couple is now bathed in bloody waters. That’s not good news. The cool bit is how Ball made Jon’s cape to look like the wing of a dragon indicating the sledgehammer revelation that is to come by the end of the episode.

The “foreshadowing” is in line with another theme from the Season 8 premiere episode which implies that “youth and happiness, and Jon and Daenerys’ brief moments together, will ‘never last’”, as Ball informed makingameofthrones.com. (Sob.)

Read also:
* 8 ‘Game of Thrones’ Fan Theories About Daenerys Targaryen’s Endgame
* ‘Game of Thrones’ Season 8: The 20 Best Quotes From Episode 4, ‘The Last of the Starks’
*’Game of Thrones’ Season 8: The 12 Best Quotes From Episode 3, “The Long Night”
* ‘Game Of Thrones’ Season 8: The 15 Best Quotes from Episode 2, “A Knight Of The Seven Kingdoms”
* ‘Game Of Thrones’: The 12 Best Quotes From The Season 8 Premiere
‘Game of Thrones’: Who’s Likely to Die in Season 8?

Iconic Beautiful Death Posters – Seasons 1-7

As Season 8’s well-scripted Episode 2, “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms”, is one of the rare GOT episodes not to feature a single death, it’s safe to say there won’t be a Beautiful Death artpiece released this week.
(UPDATE: I was wrong, there was a poster and a good one too which you can see at this link here.)

So, let’s take a look back at the most iconic Beautiful Death moments from the past seven seasons by Robert Ball:

The Execution of Ned Stark
Season 1 Episode 9

The Battle of Blackwater
Season 2 Episode 9

The Red Wedding
Season 3 Episode 9

Ygritte’s Demise at Castle Black
Season 4 Episode 9

Massacre at Hardhome
Season 5 Episode 8

Destruction of the Sept of Baelor
Season 6 Episode 10

Loot Train Attack
Season 7 Episode 4

Game of Thrones Season 8 is on Sundays (USA) / Mondays (Asia) till May 19, with a special two-hour documentary, Game of Thrones: The Last Watch, on May 26.

Read also:
7 ‘Game of Thrones’ Fan Theories About the Crypts of Winterfell
* ‘Game of Thrones’: Eight Things You Should Know About The Battle of Winterfell in Season Eight
* ‘Game of Thrones’ Season 8: Why Jon Snow May Use Greatsword Dawn to Slay the Night King

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Ash & Elm @ InterContinental SG

Scrumptious European dining at Ash & Elm.

For our latest quarterly dinner date, my church mate who shares the name of an evergreen climbing woody plant and I decided to go for European flair this time. That’s how we ended with Ash & Elm at InterContinental Singapore, which now occupies the space where the former (and rather good) Olive Tree restaurant used to be.

Decor was chic and elegant, and though the tables for two were small, the space however was comfy. After the waitress presented us with the menus, a waiter popped over to run us through the very extensive wine list comprising reds, whites, sparkling, champagnes and ports. Ash & Elm boasts three culinary theatres including a charcuterie and cheese room, wood-fired oven and an open charcoal-grill kitchen. The dinner menu thus comprises sections for charcuterie and cheese ($24-$60), wood-fired flatbreads ($22-$28), charcoal grill items ($39-$188) and a host of other meat and seafood items “from the pan” ($22-$69), plus good selections of hors d’oeuvres, salads, soups, sides and desserts.

Thought the restaurant was trying to match the water with the nice cosy chairs!

The first thing we were attracted to was the “non mineral nor sparkling” water they served us – whether warm and cold, it was a lovely blue! When asked, our server told us that the color comes from the butterfly pea flower which is said to have loads of antioxidants and health benefits for the body. Apparently the hotel was taking part in Singapore International Water Week 2019 and offering a healthy alternative for serving water was one of their contributions. Well, that’s rather ingenious I must say!

Super cool bread basket.

We thought of trying one of their hand-crafted, sourdough-based flatbreads but was quickly told that for every table, a bread basket will be provided. And what a great basket it was, there were five different types of yummy bread—the chewy mini-baguette was my fave—with portions enough for two, served with salted and seaweed butter. (So good I actually contemplate coming on my own next time and maybe just have a small charcuterie and cheese platter along with this bread basket!)

A carnivore’s delight: the Ash & Elm Platter.

Except that even a regular charcuterie and cheese platter is way too much for one person (unless you really, really enjoy chewing lots and lots of meat!) We had a regular sized Ash & Elm Platter ($28/$48 for large) which comprises house-cured beef pastrami, house-smoked pork loin, air-dried pork belly, cold-roasted beef and pressé de foie gras with smoked duck. Every item was delicious in its own way but the platter was seriously big enough for a party of four. Went very well with the wonderful bread though and I kinda regretted not ordering a red wine to go with all these great red meat.

Love it when chefs put effort to make a dish look pretty.

Knowing the platter will have a lot of beef and pork—plus the fact that most of really nice sounding meat items (especially the steaks) were a tad expensive—we went for chicken for our second dish. The French free-range yellow chicken breast a la basquaise ($34) was alright — tasty but nothing out of the extraordinary. Top marks though go to its presentation and the delicious Basmati pilaf rice and sweet cherry tomatoes.

Seasonal Vegetables Persillade

For our “healthy” bit, we opted for a side of Seasonal Vegetables Persillade ($10) which is really “side dish” sized (read: not meant for a vegetarian meal). Still, it had a good mix of veggies including sweet corn, carrot, broccoli, zucchini, cauliflower, and long bean. Other choices for sides include homemade ratatouille ($10) and sauteed mushrooms ($10).

All in all, we really had an enjoyable time at Ash & Elm, definitely one of our most satisfying dinners. As we decided we needed a walk and will have coffee and dessert elsewhere, the total came up to about $85 which is decent for what we ordered. Will definitely come back again to try other items, especially the other charcuterie and cheese platters — and to enjoy that bread basket again!

Ash & Elm is at Level 1, InterContinental Singapore, 80 Middle Road, S(188966). Breakfast: 6-10.30am daily; Lunch: 12pm-3pm (Mon to Sat); Sunday Champagne Brunch 12pm-3pm (Sundays); Dinner: 6-10.30pm daily.

Tasmania’s Finest @ SKIRT at W SG

Tasmania’s finest produce will be showcased in a seasonal menu takeover at
SKIRT @ W Singapore from now till 21 April.

Besides lush World heritage wilderness and stunning coastlines, Tasmania is renowned for their fine grub and grog. This ranges from grass-fed beef to quality cheeses, from prized black truffles to award-winning whiskeys.

It was thus with glee that Musings on the M49 accepted an invite to savor some of the Australian island-state’s finest produce at an UnDiscover Tasmania event held at SKIRT @ W Singapore last week. In conjunction with Tourism Tasmania, SKIRT will host an exclusive Tasmania’s Finest seasonal menu takeover from now till 21 April 2019.

Besides food, the event also showcased a range of Tasmania’s finest wines, whiskey, champagnes, gin and beer. I started with a Josef Chromy Pinot Noir 2016, a medium-bodied red wine, with notes of berries and spice. It complimented the slice of goat cheese cake I had very well!

Next, I tried the Elderflower Gin and Tonic, comprising Van Diemen’s Gin from Lawrenny Estate (located in Tasmania’s Central Highlands) and Ashbolt Elderflower Concentrate. It was light, breezy and refreshing, just apt for the blazing hot weather we’ve been having of late!

First on the list of the Tasmania’s Finest Grazing Menu is Lentara Groves Olives. Lentara Grove is one of the oldest olive groves in Tasmania and produces quality products such as extra virgin olive oil.

Next up was the Cape Grim Beef Tartar. Located along north-western Tasmania, Cape Grim reportedly has the cleanest air in the world. Not sure how much it affects the cattle raised there but this beef tartar was tender and its taste enhanced by the well-made crispy egg yolk.

Spring Bay, located on the eastern coast of Tasmania, is famous for its fresh seafood and this Spring Bay Mussels Pot was simply the bomb! Stewed in a tomato broth, the mussels were small but oh so tender and juicy. Easily one of the best dishes of the night!

I popped the next item, the TAS-SAFF Saffron Arancini with truffle aioli, into my mouth before taking a decent picture of it. So all I could tell you is that it was really good – crunchy and flavorful, just like this lovely foccacia bread which, alas, is not on the grazing menu.

Halfway through I decided it was time for a Tasmanian beer. Moo Brew Pilsner is styled like a German Pilsner, with a good mix of hops and malts, fruity aroma and a slight bitter aftertaste. Light and refreshing, went very well with various food. Brand owned by David Walsh, the man behind the famous MONA (Museum of Old and New Art).

Tasmania though is foremost famous for its whiskey. The Apple Isle is Australia’s biggest whiskey producer and Sullivans Cove is among its best brands. Its Single Cask Malt Whiskey was smooth, rich and full-bodied, great on the rocks and even better if you drink it neat.

The grazing menu has two choices for mains. The Cape Grim Shortribs, grilled with smoked garlic and red wine sauce, was meaty yet tender, and tasted better with the brown gravy it came with and even more so if you drink a good whiskey along with it!

The other main, the Petunia Ocean Trout En Croute with wasabi beurre blanc, was a pure delight. The fish was velvety and favorful, and you won’t stop till you finished every bite. The Josef Chromy Sparkling 2011 champagne, which has strong green apple notes (too fruity for my taste), went well with this dish.

The mains also came with sides including juicy grilled baby carrots, tarragon curd, grilled broccolini and gratin potatoes (left) which was really nice.

Last but by no means least, the dessert came in the form of a Golden Gay Time comprising dark chocolate, Dolce De Leche ice cream, honeycomb and nuts, which offered an explosive burst of sweet flavors that was simply heavenly. Everyone agreed that it was a great sweet way to end the evening.

So if you enjoy great food or have always wanted to check out food produce from Tasmania (especially fresh sustainably sourced meats, seafood and other stuff), do check out SKIRT’s Tasmania’s Finest seasonal menu takeover. The special grazing menu, priced at SGD85+++ per person, will be on till 21 April 2019.

SKIRT is at W Singapore, Sentosa Cove 21 Ocean Way, Singapore 98374. Tel: +6568087278. Opening hours: Sat 12pm-3pm; Sun-Thu 6pm-11.30pm (last food order at 9.30pm); Fri, Sat, Eve of Public Holidays & Public Holidays: 6pm-12am (last food order at 10.30pm).

First Look At Stars Of Disney’s ‘Aladdin’ The Musical @ Marina Bay Sands

Aladdin the Broadway musical will stage its first and only Asian stop in Singapore at
the Sands Theatre in July 2019. [Photo Credit: Base Entertainment Asia]

Good news if you are a fan of Disney’s Aladdin. This year, not only you will get to see the live-action adaptation of the 1992 Oscar-winning animated film in May, its hit Broadway theatrical production will also make its debut here in Singapore, its only stop in Asia, at Marina Bay Sands in July.

So it was a thrill when Musings on the M49 was invited to the media launch for Aladdin the musical for which its three leading stars–namely Gareth Jacobs (Genie), Graeme Isaako (Aladdin) and Shubshri Kandiah (Jasmine)–flew in specially to publicise the show.

The event was held at Sands Theatre at an auditorium behind the main stage. Besides drinks and canapés, there were also costumes from the show set up on site for guests to admire up close.

Aladdin, which tells the story of a street urchin who wins the heart of a princess with the help of a genie, promises to present the most lavish sets, vibrant costumes and
stunning special effects ever to be seen at the Sands Theatre.

The musical, which made its world premiere on Broadway in 2014 , will have over 330 glittering costumes, featuring more than 1000 fabrics and almost half a million Swarovski crystals. Its mega sets include the fantasy city of Agrabah, the Sultan’s palace, and the legendary Cave of Wonders.

Songs Maketh the Musical
And not forgetting of course, the Oscar-winning score and songs by Alan Menken with lyrics by Howard Ashman, Tim Rice and Chad Beguelin (who also wrote the book). The musical features five songs from the beloved animated film including the all-time classic, ‘A Whole New World’, plus a few more written specially for the stage version.

The charming Graeme Isaako is Aladdin.

After opening addresses by the good people responsible for bringing in Aladdin, we were introduced first to the Sydney-born, New Zealand-raised Graeme Isaako who plays the titular character. Armed with a dazzling smile and “K-pop hair” (his words, not mine), the singer/dancer/actor spoke on how hard he had to work for the show, especially as Aladdin is a very energetic character for whom parkour skills are required, besides singing and dancing abilities. Issako, who made his musical debut in 2002, then showed off his smooth vocals when he performed ‘Proud Of Your Boy’, a ballad that was cut from the original film.

Shubshri Kandiah singing the cherished duet, ‘A Whole New World’,
with Graeme Isaako.

Next up was Shubshri Kandiah who hails from Queensland and who won the role of Jasmine in the Australian production of Aladdin straight after graduating from university in 2017. The radiant artiste disclosed how delighted she is to play a princess who is “feisty and independent” and “close to my heart”. After revealing that one of her favorite songs in the stage musical is ‘A Million Miles Away’, in which Jasmines sings about her dreams, she teamed up with Isaako to sing the all-time favorite, ‘A Whole New World’, which thrilled the audience no end.

Gareth Jacobs, who plays the Genie, performing the showstopper ‘Friend Like Me’ complete with backup singers.

Finally, we met with the Genie himself in the form of Gareth Jacobs who has led the Australian touring company in this role from Melbourne, Australia to Auckland, New Zealand. After revealing that Aladdin was the very first film he saw as a nine-year-old, Jacobs informed us that his favorite moments of doing the stage musical are performing the 15-minute showstopper, ‘Friend Like Me’; being shot out of a cannon; and improvising jokes. Most of all though, it was meeting his idol, composer Alan Menken, in person when he first took on the role.

Gareth Jacobs as Genie and Graeme Isaako as Aladdin in one of the big production numbers in Aladdin the musical. [Photo Credit: Base Entertainment Asia]

When asked if he will do anything exclusively for the Singapore show, Jacobs–who had previously lived and worked in Singapore for five years–affirmed that he (as the Genie) often tells some jokes that is relevant to the city the show is playing at and so local audiences here will have to “watch and find out!” He then ended his segment with a rousing performance of ‘Friend Like Me’ with the help of two sassy back-up singers.

Yours truly with the talented Aladdin cast
AND a magic lamp!

After a Q&A session, the cast generously posed for photos with almost everyone who was present, complete with magic lamp. Alas, I didn’t get a chance to rub it and make a wish, let alone wishes three. Still, I got to hold it and got close to a smiling genie, so that’s good enough for me!

Aladdin the Broadway musical plays at the Sands Theatre at Marina Bay Sands, Singapore from July 21, 2019. Performances: Tue to Fri, 7.30pm; Sat 2pm & 7.30pm; and Sun 1pm & 6.30pm. Tickets from $68++ from www.marinabaysands.com/ticketing or www.sistic.com.

Unless stated, all photos by Marguerita Tan. No text or images from this post are to be used without the blog author’s permission.

Japan Cool: Unique Products From Japanese Prefectures

Sagabiyori rice from Takeo City, Saga Prefecture

If you can’t go to Japan, let Japan come to you.

In the past few years, I’ve been trying to arrange a cherry blossom holiday (March-April) to Japan but each time something or other would crop up and I end up going somewhere else.

Hence I was pleased when Musings on the M49 was invited by Media Japan and the Japan Local Government Alliance to a special preview session to sample unique products from three Japanese prefectures. At least I get to see some things uniquely Japan right here in Singapore!

Held at Tomi Sushi @ Millenia Walk, the preview showcased three Japanese product and food items namely Sagabiyori rice from Takeo City in Saga Prefecture, Senshu cotton towels from Izumisano City in Osaka Prefecture, and Tsuiki aluminium spoons from TsubameSanjo City in Niigata Prefecture.

Sagabiyori Rice from Saga Prefecture

First item for us to sample was Sagabiyori Japanese rice. The short-grain rice is primarily planted and harvested in Saga Prefecture, located north of Kyushu Island in the south of Japan. Rice farming is the main industry in Saga’s fertile plains, while fishing thrives in the coastal areas.

Thanks to venue host Tomi Sushi, we got to try the Sagabiyori Japanese rice in the form of onigiri rice balls, wrapped in toasted seaweed. If you love Japanese cuisine, you will know that the Japanese rice used is often light, fluffy and sightly sticky. Sagabiyori Japanese rice is rather different – the rice grains are bigger, a tad sweeter and not that sticky.

Often eaten as a snack or a quick breakfast/lunch item in Japan, the onigiri stuffed with tuna mayo and spicy ikura (large red Japanese caviar, pictured left) were really tasty and delicious. Even without stuffing, plain onigiri made of Sagabiyori Japanese rice was very filling on its own.

The premium rice brand—granted the top ‘Special A’ ranking by the Japan Grain Inspection Association—is available in 5kg packs from $60 in Isetan and Meidi-ya.

Senshu Cotton Towels from Osaka Prefecture

Next, we were introduced to the soft-to-the-touch Senshu cotton towels, known for their high water absorbency. Truth be told, I never knew towel production was a thing in Japan! The industry started as far back as 1887 when Japanese native Enjiro Satoi, impressed by quality imported towels, decided to produce his own towels in the Senshu region in Osaka Prefecture (an hour’s train ride from Kansai International Airport).

As lots of Senshu towels were provided at the event for us to touch and feel, their softness and gentleness cannot be doubted. We were also informed that the towels do not contain any wax, glue and dyes due to Atozarashi, a process unique to the Izumisano towel-producing region. This process involves thoroughly rinsing off waste and by-products from the delicate towel fabrics with fresh underground water.

We were also encouraged to soak the Senshu towels with water to test its high water absorbency. Well, when drenched, the towel certainly absorbed well with hardly any water droplets rolling off the material’s surface (like very cheap towels do). Along with its soft texture—a key feature for me when it comes to buying face towels—the Senshu towel is a product worth considering.

Available in various colors and sizes, Senshu face towels priced from $6-$8 can be found in Takashimaya and Isetan.

Tsuiki Aluminium Spoons from Niigata Prefecture

One thing I love about Japan is that they seem to have an invention for everything in life – from the world’s first rice cooker to, er, square watermelons. Well, at this preview, we were introduced to these cool looking, aluminium “thermal conduction” ice cream spoons from TsubameSanjo City in Niigata Prefecture, a 70-minute train ride north of Tokyo.

Produced by Tsuiki in TsubameSanjo, an area renowned for the production of quality metal wares, each spoon is made from 100% aluminium. The way it works is that if you hold it for at least 10 seconds, it will conduct your body heat down to its squared-shape bowl tip, warming it up enough to slice through ice-cold desserts such as ice creams and puddings easily!

Have to confess it didn’t really worked for me at the preview as the tips of my fingers were rather cold then and I felt the ice cream given to us were kinda soft in the first place. Even if the heat bit need a bit of work to work, I love the spoon’s shiny look and its design which makes it very comfortable to hold. I did try it again at home when my hand was warmer and the spoon did slice through my hard butter easily. Also, the Tsuiki spoon definitely heats up when I used it to stir hot coffee!

Tsuiki ice cream spoons, priced from $10-$15 in various colors, are currently available exclusively at Tomi Sushi @ Millenia Walk.

Fat Belly @ Serene Centre

Fat Belly, a wine and steak place, is nestled within ice cream parlor, Sugarhaus.

Last month, after conducting a full day’s media training, I decided to treat myself to a hearty steak dinner. But where should I go for a jolly good one? “Go to the one in an ice cream shop at Serene Centre,” cooed my training partner. Sorry, come again? She wasn’t kidding. Goodness know how many times I’ve eaten at Serene Centre in Farrer Road – ‘cos that’s where our dear friend always dropped me on route to her home – but I never knew there is a steak place called Fat Belly hidden inside Sugarhaus!

Even so, I almost bypassed it again ‘cos Sugarhaus still and always looked totally like an ice cream parlour inside and out. Upon a closer check however, yes you can see a kitchen with a narrow counter behind the ice cream counter with a sign on the wall saying “Fat Belly”. The counter was full that Monday evening but diners are allowed to sit at the Sugarhaus tables.

Roasted Spiced Sweet Potato

Fat Belly’s menu is simple. The Charcoal Grill selection has only three items – Angus Flat Iron Steak (USDA 150day Grain Fed, $22); Angus Short Rib Steak (USDA Grain Fed, $25); and Wagyu Marble Score 4-5 Onglet Steak ($38), and each paired with a recommended glass of wine ($12-$15). Add $13 and you can include a side ($5) such as Creamed Kale or Sauteed Thyme Mushroom and a dessert ($12) such as Foie Gras Panna Cotta and Sticky Date Pudding. For dinner, there’s an “Alternative Experience” ($78) which includes items such as a beef steak, beef char siew, mini beef burger and a sweet. I assume the special menu entry was for groups to share as they down wines as the drinks selection is primarily red and white wines (from $9/glass to $90/bottle).

After the waitress confirmed that the steaks come “only with a little asparagus”, I ordered a side of roasted spiced sweet potato ($5) to go with my main course. And though Alamos Malbec 2016 from Argentina ($12/glass) is recommended as a good pairing for the beef item I chose, I opted for a glass of Victoria Park Cabernet Sauvignon 2016 ($9/glass), a South Australian wine richly flavored with notes of spice and berries.

The absolutely succulent, juicy Angus Flat Iron Steak.

The main course didn’t take long to arrive and though the dish was very simply presented with just gravy and three miserable albeit crunchy sticks of asparagus, the Angus Flat Iron Steak ($22) cooked medium rare was absolutely tender, succulent and oozing with juice. It was arguably the best steak I’ve ever eaten for quite some time! Needless to say, I really took my time to chew and savor each slice as long as I can.

It was certainly a satisfying meal to end a tiring day. The bill came up to $42++ which is decent for a steak-and-wine dinner. Will definitely make a return to try the other items.

Fat Belly is at 10 Jalan Serene, #01-04 Serene Centre (within Sugarhaus), Singapore 258748. For reservations, call 6314 2247.

Komyuniti @ Yotel Singapore

Celebrating Renri @ Komyuniti

When a bunch of my mates from TV days decided to meet for Chinese New Year, we didn’t realized that we had chosen Renri or Yan Yat – the 7th day of the Lunar New Year – to meet. So, auspicious it was when we all gathered to celebrate “everyone’s birthday” at Komyuniti, nestled on the 10th floor of Yotel hotel (next to the swimming pool) in the heart of Orchard Road.

We lo hei with a yu sheng of a different kind!

Slick and modern with a full bar, Komyuniti was also chosen for its central location and the fact that it serves yu sheng. The CNY raw fish dish ($28.80/small) was very unique though as it had many substitutes for the traditional ingredients. For the main salad base, besides carrot and cucumber, there were also purple lettuce, yellow bell pepper, beetroot and spinach. And instead of peanuts and crackers, it was rice krispies and crispy fish skin. There was even sunflower seeds and a yuzu dressing for good measure! You probably could call it an “angmo” version – it definitely had a different taste but overall, along with the thick slices of salmon, it served its purpose of auspiciously kicking off our dinner date. (And belated apologies to the hotel guest diners as we lo hei at the top of our voices when we tossed for good fortune in the Year of the Pig!)

[If you need help with Lo Hei Phrases, check out my blog post “Lo Hei Phrases 101”.]

Sharing Plates Galore

Komyuniti’s food menu comprises a wide selection of appetizers, bar bites, small plates and big plates for sharing, while its drink menu has an extensive range of wines, cocktails, spirits, house craft beers and hot beverages. As there were nine of us, we opted to order a few bar bites and small versions of the big plates to share, whilst the one vegetarian among us ordered his preferred dishes though the waiter did offer to make a Beef Bolognese for him without the beef bits which was nice of them.

The Shoestring Fries with Rosemary Garlic ($9) was the first to arrive, and they were crispy and lovely. The portions are probably meant for 2-3 pax to share so if you have a bigger group, you will need at least two orders. We made do by first limiting each one to 6 fries, before extending it to 12 each…

Next up was the Crab Rillette ($14) which is delicious chill crab “pate” on rice krispies. Very nice even after having to halve each piece so all of us can have a bite.

The Charred Kailan ($10) with caramalised onion puree, fried ginger and garlic chips, was… fascinating. Not sure if the ginger was too overpowering but the kailan took a while to get used to but at the end, it was a nice veggie dish to have.

All the big plates have snack portions. This is the mini version of the Buttermilk Fried Chicken ($13) served in a sweet potato mash. It was nice and a fancy way of serving chicken nuggets you could say.

The Roasted Pork Belly ($10/snack) was my favorite though. Succulent with crispy skin and served with potatoes, green apple and brussel sprouts, it was a dish which I wished I didn’t have to share! A big plate would be too much for one though.

The snack version of the Pan Seared Snapper ($9) could be a main course on its own really. Meat was tasty and would probably be even better if eaten with rice.

Talking about rice, the mini Teriyaki Rice Bowl ($9) complete with egg could also be a main course on its own. This dish is hard to share, like, what can we do with the egg but to mesh it with the rice? But the chicken was tasty and the Japanese rice chewy and fragrant.

The Slow Roasted Duck Breast ($10/snack) with braised red cabbage and carrot puree was another nice meat dish. But between this and the roasted pork belly, I prefer the latter.

Presentation of all the dishes were great except for this one so much so we thought it was ordered by our vegetarian friend (hee hee). Luckily, the waiter quickly informed us that it’s actually the mini Beef Bolognese ($9) with beef in it. Ah-so! Well, it’s a flavorful pasta and the portion is just nice for a snack.

We also ordered a Waldorf Salad ($11), which was alright except the green apple slices were like, whoa, utterly soaked in balsamic vinegar or something which utterly woke up everyone who ate a slice! Our vegetarian friend ordered a Beetroot Salad ($11) which is seemingly a Waldorf with, er, beetroot. Just realized that the salads are more expensive than the meat snack items. Hmm…

Last but no means least, our friend also ordered a plate of fried Padron Peppers ($9) which were not “hot” but deliciously sweet and yummy.

So stuffed we were we decided to forgo dessert (of which there ar but three items) and coffee/tea. All in all, the bill came up to about $180, which means just $20 per person. Extremely worth it as the food was good and the place has great ambience. Komyuniti is areat place for powwows with friends and associates alike. Will certainly make a return.

Komyuniti is at 366 Orchard Road, Level 10 Yotel Singapore.
Opening hours: 6.30am-12am (Sun-Thu); 6.30am-1am (Fri & Sat)