Pondok Tempo Doeloe @ Surabaya, Indonesia

“What’s good to eat here?” That’s the first thing a group of us from Singapore who were in Surabaya for the first time asked our local friend who was driving us to our hotel on the west side of the Indonesian city.

“Well, there’s the popular deep fried ‘flying fish’…” Ohhhhhh.

“There’s also ayam bakar (roasted chicken)….” Ahhhhhh.

“And our roast duck….” Drooool!

In the end, after being bombarded by a gazillion questions from his food-mad visitors, our friend simply realized that the best way to show us just how good the local food is was to bring us to a reputable Indonesian restaurant for dinner.

Pondok Tempo Doeloe: Traditional Indonesian Cuisine

Located down the right far end of the road from our Fairfield at Marriott Hotel and housed in a huge building with its own carpark, Pondok Tempo Doeloe prides itself on serving authentic Indonesian cuisine. It is part of the Ikan Bakar Cianjur (IBC) Group which has a string of restaurants in Surabaya to Bali that specializes in Indonesian cuisine.

We were there early for a 5.30pm dinner but the brightly lit and spacious restaurant filled up quickly even on a weekday night. The venue was also chosen as it could accommodate our large group of about 30 by joining three big tables on one side of the dining area. Being the visitors, we simply left the ordering to our host. Just bring it on!

The first dish to arrive was the much talked-about “Flying Fish” or Gurame Goreng, a deep fried fresh water carp marinated with a special sauce. The fish is so called as one side of its meat is curled up during frying as if it has a flying fin. The meat is not only tasty — especially when eaten with either sambal belachan or sliced red chili in black soy sauce — every part of the fish was super crispy and munching each bit of it was so good!

There was also another style of fish ordered – the Gurame Bakar, a Javanese-styled flame grilled fresh water carp that offered softer texture and a different spice flavor. Crispy as it was, it wasn’t quite as fun as when eating the flying fish!

Another great dish was the Ayam Bakar or Javanese grilled chicken marinated with spices that was truly fragrant and yummilicious. It was certainly a delicious flavor that many of us have never tasted before!

Just like with Chinese cuisine, the above meat dishes were best eaten with fluffy white rice. And of course, you also need to have some greens to balance all the fried stuff. Indonesian vegetable dishes are hardly different from Chinese favorites and so we had the likes of Sauteed Baby Kai Lan and Sauteed Kangkong, albeit cooked with a dash of sambal.

​When it came to drinks, a team member who has been to Surabaya before highly recommended the Juice Alpukat, an ice blend avocado juice served with a dose of sweet syrup which we thought was gula melaka (palm sugar) at first but it was just something that is sweet. Well, I was skeptical at first. As much as I love avocado – more as a salad or sandwich garnish – drinking a whole cup of blended avocado didn’t sound quite appetizing. I was pleasantly proven wrong – the thick, creamy and sweetened “smoothie” was actually quite enjoyable and I finished every drop!

In the next few nights, we would continue to be taken to try out other authentic Indonesian dishes at other popular restaurants in the city. But just on our first night in Surabaya alone, the Flying Fish had us at hello! Here’s to many more!

​Pondok Tempo Doeloe is at Jl Mayjend Sungkoko 206-208 Surabaya, Indonesia.

Japan: Ghibli Museum in Tokyo-A Must-Visit For Studio Ghibli Fans

[Photo Credit: Ghibli Museum Souvenir Program]

When in Japan: If you are a huge fan of Studio Ghibli or animation in general, visiting the Ghibli Museum in Tokyo is a must.

The brainchild of Hayao Miyazaki, renowned Japanese animator and co-founder of animation powerhouse Studio Ghibli, the one-of-its-kind museum is dedicated to all things Ghibli and the art of animation. Being a longtime Studio Ghibli fan—from My Neighbor Totoro to Spirited Away, Ponyo on the Cliff by the Sea to The Red Turtle—visiting Ghibli Museum was hence my top priority whilst I was in Tokyo last November.

By Advance Reservation Only
Opened in October 2001 and located in Mitaka, a short train ride from Shinjuku Station, the Ghibli Museum is so exclusive that no tickets are sold at the venue. They can only be purchased online with authorized dealers which you can find on the museum’s website. As it is a very popular destination, tickets get sold out as soon as they are available. Thus, to avoid disappointment, I simply left it to my travel planner, Joey of Atlas Travelz, to book tickets for me and my travel mate after providing her with our preferred date and time of visit. It was with joy when she confirmed the purchase prior to our leaving for Japan!

Have your passport and ticket ready whilst queuing at the museum's entrance. [Credit: Marguerita Tan]

From Mitaka Station, it’s a 15-20 minute walk to the museum which is located in the west of lush Inokashira Park, but we decided to take the shuttle bus instead—which alas is not a Cat Bus but a vehicle gaily painted with Studio Ghibli characters—that goes from the station to the museum (round-trip ¥320/SGD4).

We chose the 2pm entry time slot as my BFF, who had visited before, said more than two hours will be needed to thoroughly cover every nook and corner including the museum’s exteriors. (Thus 4pm is too tight as the museum closes at 6pm). Besides tickets, a passport for identification purposes is also required for entry, so do remember to bring yours along if you have a ticket for visiting the museum.

For Your Eyes Only – No Photography Allowed Indoors

Just seeing the brightly colored, European-styled building, bedecked with leafy coverings, from the outside already made you feel like you are on the magical setting of a Studio Ghibli film. The glee of finally being there was halted somewhat when we were told at the entrance that no photography was allowed indoors. Sob! However, what awaited us within more than made up for that slight disappointment…

A Museum Where Those Seeking Enjoyment Can Enjoy

A Ghibli Museum poster showing a cross-section of the 4-story building. [Credit: Ghibli Museum]

In a museum souvenir program filled with his original concept illustrations, sketches and notes, Miyazaki stated the kind of museum that he wanted to make is one “that is interesting and relaxes the soul… where those seeking enjoyment can enjoy… and a museum that makes you feel more enriched when you leave than when you entered!” Well, it’s definitely all these and then some.

Upon entering you will be greeted by colorful flora and fauna, as well as recognizable Ghibli characters such as Totoro, Satsuki and Mei, painted on the ceiling and walls, as well as on the stained-glass windows. At the reception, a museum ticket in the form of a 35mm film strip is handed to every visitor in exchange for the ticket voucher. (Mine I think is a strip from Castle In The Sky but I have to re-watch the film to be sure!)

Fascinating Rooms and Spaces

[Credit: Ghibli Museum souvenir program]

From the reception, we went down a flight of stairs which brought us to the Central Hall in the basement, whilst its domed glass ceiling (with images of Ponyo and her sea friends) is way above the second floor. Here you will have a fish-eye view of the number of spaces you can explore – a spiral staircase, a cast-iron elevator, a bridged passage, intricately designed restrooms, etc. This floor also houses the Saturn Theater, a small but vibrantly decorated screening room that screens Studio Ghibli original short films made exclusively for the museum including Miyazaki’s last known work, Boro The Catepillar (2018).

Exclusive Screenings of Studio Ghibli Short Films

During our visit, we first got to watch Imaginary Flying Machines (2002), which features director Hayao Miyazaki himself in the form of a humanoid pig akin to the main character in 1992’s Porco Russo, narrating the history of aviation. The second was the charming and heartwarming tale of Mr Dough and the Egg Princess (2010) which tells of a tiny egg girl who decides to run away with her new dough friend, so to escape the clutches of her evil witch mistress. Both were equally delightful, well worth the 25-30 minute wait to get into the 80-seat theater.

Insightful Look Into The Art & Processes of Animation

One of the museum’s highlights are the rooms with exhibits devoted to the art of animation. In “The Beginning of Movement”, visitors get to see many original artworks from different Studio Ghibli films, including an amazing 3D Zoetrope “Bouncing Totoro” display showing how animators made Satsuki and Mei dance with a grinning Totoro in My Neighbour Totoro. In “Where a Film is Born”, rooms are bedecked with things you will find in the working spaces of an animator — from storyteller to background artist, staging to inker and painter.

There are also temporary exhibits that will change from time to time. For instance, the special exhibition we saw, “Sketch, Flash, Spark! — From the Ghibli Forest Sketchbook” —showing how the museum was designed and built—will run till May 2021 (tentative).

Other Enchanting Spaces

[Credit: Ghibli Museum souvenir program]

The museum also boasts a giant cuddly-looking Cat Bus which only young children can play with (bah!) Here’s hoping that the planned Studio Ghibli theme park in Nagoya due for completion in 2022 will have either a giant Totoro or Cat Bus that adults can play with!

Robot soldier at the museum's rooftop garden. [Credit: Marguerita Tan]

As photography is allowed outdoors, needless to say, the Robot Soldier from Castle in the Sky (1986)—who many mistook for the Iron Giant from 1999’s The Iron Giant (including us)—on the rooftop garden was a very popular selfie / wefie target. To get up here, one has to climb a towering iron-cast spiral staircase located outside the Cat Bus Room.

In the premises, there’s also has a library-cum-book shop, cafe (with indoor and al fresco areas, selling ice cream, hotdogs, etc), children’s play area, garden patio and an extremely popular gift shop named Mamma Aiuto! (Italian for “Mama, help me”.) Named after the sky pirates in Porco Russo, the shop has everything Studio Ghibli you would love to own, from pins to handicraft sets to adorable plushies. As we are not super rich, we found the pricing rather expensive sadly. But if you can control your must-buy urges, there’s a store within Tokyo Station that sells official merchandise at slightly more affordable prices. But of course, the museum gift shop also have more exclusive stuff.

Ghibli Museum souvenir programs available from the museum gift shop, Mamma Aiuto! [Credit: Marguerita Tan]

In the end, I decided to go for this set of two Ghibli Museum souvenir programs which cost only ¥1000 and also came with a complimentary, almost 4-foot long poster of a cross-section illustration of the museum (pictured midway in this post). The booklet top left is filled with Miyazaki’s original concept sketches of the museum as well as his thoughts of what he wanted for it, while the one on the right is filled with well-shot photos of the museum’s key features. And oh, I also bought a key-chain with a mini Totoro plushie ‘cos you just can’t leave here without a memento of the iconic creature. (Especially when it seems we missed seeing the giant Totoro figure that was supposed to be housed in the museum’s old reception!)

All in all, it was a totally worthwhile trip to the Ghibli Museum for this animation and Studio Ghibli fan. Do consider going if you are one too and planning a trip to Tokyo, Japan in the near future. You won’t regret it!

Ghibli Museum is in Mitaka, Tokyo, Japan. Closed on Tuesdays, special holidays, and often for periodic maintenance, so do check its website at http://www.ghibli-museum.jp/en/ for its calendar, ticketing details, and other information.

My Studio Ghibli haul (mainly plushies, socks, and towels), plus the Museum's cool film strip ticket. (Mind not my free Frozen 2 sticker sheet from a Shinjuku store...)

Read also:
* 5 Things We Want to See in Studio Ghibli’s Theme Park in 2022
* Studio Ghibli Sees First East-west Collaboration in the Wordless Wonder ‘The Red Turtle’
* 6 Great Fantasy Films That Studio Ponoc’s ‘Mary and the Witch’s Flower’ Will Lovingly Remind You Of


Japan: 5 Best Spots To View Mount Fuji In Kawaguchiko

When in Japan: Catching a good glimpse of Mount Fuji is a must.

After years of trying, my dream of a Mount Fuji holiday finally materialized in November 2019. I have always been fascinated by Japan’s tallest peak (at 3,776 metres)—and an active volcano at that—and thus for my second trip to the Land of the Rising Sun, I wanted to be at the best spots to view the iconic mountain.

I have always managed my own travel arrangements but for the first time (in forever), I gave all my requirements to Joey Sim of Atlas Travelz agency and let her handled all the arrangements of this Japanese trip for me.

My original plan was to travel to just Hakone and Tokyo, but upon knowing my wish for “a hotel with onsen and a Mount Fuji view, with or without lake”, Joey recommended that I go to Kawaguchiko instead, before moving on to the other two destinations. And her recommendation was truly appreciated as the opportunities to view Mount Fuji at different angles in the Yamanashi Prefecture – about 2.5 hours by bus from Tokyo – went beyond my expectations.

Thanks to the great sunny autumn weather we had during our stay at Kawaguchiko – my BFF had joined me by then – my Mount Fuji obsession was totally satiated. (It also more than made up for the disappointment of our totally rained-out Hakone jaunt.) If you too would like to be at good locations to admire the picturesque peak, here are 5 best spots in Kawaguchiko to do so.

5 Best Spots to View Mount Fuji at Kawaguchiko

  1. Fuji View Hotel

Of course, there are other hotels, resorts or ryokans in the vicinity which may also boast good views of Mount Fuji, or are much closer to the central Kawaguchiko Station, but then again, there is a very good reason why this hotel is named “Fuji View”. Thanks to Joey’s recommendation, the awesome view from our 2nd-floor room balcony (see above) was worth the price alone. The fact that the hotel also has a well-equipped onsen, as well as beautiful gardens bursting with autumn colors made it even more worthwhile.

2. Mount Fuji 5th Station

About an hour ride on the Hiking Bus from Kawaguchiko Station will bring you to Mount Fuji 5th Station, located at 2,300m above sea level and the closest you can get to the peak (unless you plan to climb it of course). Upon disembarking from the bus, I asked my travel mate, “Where’s Mount Fuji?” “You are on it,” she deadpanned. And whoa, she was right! Just look up and you can see the breathtaking snow-covered summit in all her glory, against a clear blue sky and beautifully lit by the sun. Besides many areas for visitors to take selfies/wefies with the mount, the tourist hotspot also houses a shrine, a post office, shops, eateries, and platforms to view the Fuji Five Lakes area.

3. Lake Kawaguchi

A cruise on Lake Kawaguchi – from its eastern shore to and fro Kawaguchiko Ohashi Bridge – will provide you with unblocked views of Mount Fuji, ie, if you could get a good spot by the side of the boat. It was a tad misty the day we were there but the view was still absorbing nonetheless. Along the promenade, the trees were a delightful sight with their autumn colors of reds, orange, and yellows. Cherry blossoms are said to be in abundance here around mid-April. You can get here via the Red Line Bus or the Mount Fuji World Heritage Loop Bus from Kawaguchiko Station.

4. Mount Fuji Panoramic Ropeway

Directly across the Lake Kawaguchi cruise pier, you will find the Mount Fuji Panoramic Ropeway which provides great, yes, panoramic views of the sacred mountain and the lake districts. You can actually skip the cruise and go directly up the ropeway, but you get a discount if you buy a combo ticket for both attractions at the pier, so why not? Unless you stand at the ropeway carriage window facing the lake, there’s not much to see but trees until you reach the observation deck which is about 1000 metres above sea level and near the peak of Mount Tenjo. If you get here just before sunset, there’s a lovely reddish-orange glow over Mount Fuji, Lake Kawaguchi, and the provinces around them.

5. Chureito Pagoda

“Visit Mount Arakura Sengen Shrine for undoubtedly the best postcard view of 5-storey Chureito Pagoda against the backdrop of Mount Fuji”, trumpeted my itinerary. Guess I missed out on the tiny detail that there is also a hefty 398-step climb up before one reaches the observation deck for the famous image of Mount Fuji flanked by a pagoda and cherry blossoms seen on many a Visit Japan brochure! But thanks to my trekking stick, and lots of rest stops, have to admit that the view was ultimately worth climbing for. There’s a slight jostle for the best spot to take the above-pictured view but once you get it, do take time to check out other areas on the hill where you can admire the grandeur of Mount Fuji.

All photos by Marguerita Tan.
No text or photos to be reproduced without the blog author’s permission.

‘Frozen 2’ Fun @ Singapore Changi Airport

Look out for a giant Olaf at Singapore Changi Airport T2!

If you or your kids are big fans of Disney’s Frozen 2, do make your way down to Singapore Changi Airport where there are loads of fun Instagram-worthy opportunities with the lovable characters from the blockbuster animated film, which has since grossed over US$1 billion (S$1.36b) at the global box office.

The main highlight of A Frozen Wonderland At Changi is located at the airport’s Terminal 3 Departure Hall (in front of Departure Immigration). Here you will find a handful of life-sized sets inspired by the enchanting film featuring key characters namely Queen Elsa, Princess Anna, Olaf, Kristoff, Sven, and Grand Pabbie.

Every night till Jan 5, 2020, there will be an entralling light, sound and snow show at 7.30pm, 8pm, 8.30pm and 9pm, which primarily tells the story of Frozen 2, in which Queen Elsa and company go in search of a mystery voice she’s been hearing that or who may save the kingdom of Arendelle from grave danger. Needless to say, spoilers galore at the attraction (and this blog post) if you have yet to see the film!

Grand Pabbie, the wise old troll, should be the first figure you see if you approach the set from the front as he’s extremely well lit.

Over to the right, you will find Anna and Olaf in a boat, depicting the scene when Elsa sent them away for their safety.

At a lovely autumn-inspired spot, and besides four elemental pillars, you will find macho Kristoff and his faithful reindeer, Sven, in the midst of life-like looking trees and plants and in a great rush to find his beloved Anna.

Last but not least, on the biggest structure, you will find the getting-more-powerful Queen Elsa tackling Nokk, the mythical water horse spirit, in stormy seas. This set has a big part to play during the daily show, so make sure you have a good view of it during the performance!

LET IT SNOW, LET IT SNOW

Each show will end with a dramatic snowfall scenario that everyone of all ages thoroughly enjoyed! It’s mainly soap suds in case you are wondering!

This moment lasted quite long and, have to say, my pal and I had great fun taking wefies and being covered in “snow”, as did everyone around us!

OTHER FROZEN 2 SIGHTINGS…

Elsewhere in T3 Departure Hall, you will find an Enchanted Forest as well as an Arendelle Castle, where you can pose with cardboard cut-outs of Elsa and Anna, or check out these utterly cute 1-metre-tall plushies of Olaf and Sven.

These sections have areas and activities primarily designed for kids, but you would require a pass (and probably need to spend some money on a single receipt that kind of thing.) Visit https://frozenwonderland.changiairport.com/ for more information on how one can participate.

Over at Jewel, there is also some Frozen 2 content. At the Cloud9 Piazza on Level 5, there is an Arendelle-inspired festival market with a few stalls selling Frozen 2 merchandise. But the draw is definitely these life-sized models of Princess Anna and Queen Elsa. An Olaf figure can also be found at one of the festival’s gates.

For a great shot of the lovable snowman though, you have to pop to Terminal 2 for this larger-than-life, 3-metre-tall, spinning Olaf which is easily a big draw. Don’t miss it!

A Frozen Wonderland At Changi will be at T3, T2 and Jewel until Jan 5, 2020.
For more information, visit https://frozenwonderland.changiairport.com/.

Read also:
* ‘Frozen 2’: The 20 Best Quotes from the Disney Animated Blockbuster Sequel
* ‘Frozen 2’ Leaked Image Shows Elsa and Anna in an Autumn Setting

Casa del Mar @ Langkawi

Having been to Malacca and Penang for my last two short-haul breaks, I opted for Langkawi as my next Malaysian holiday destination as (1) friends who’d been there liked it, and (2) it was also where a few key scenes of the global hit, Crazy Rich Asians, were shot. That’s how I ended up at the lovely Mediterranean-style boutique hotel, Casa del Mar Langkawi.

All I wanted was a cosy beach resort with a nice pool, scenic beachfront views, and good grub and grog. A pal hence suggested Casa del Mar and what a good recommendation it was. It was strategically located in the popular Pantai Cenang beach town, right on the edge of the white sands of Cenang beach.

Cab from Langkawi airport to the hotel (MYR30/SGD10) took only 15 minutes and as I was a tad early for check-in, the front desk staff ensured that I was comfortable with a chilled welcome drink and towel. I even had the opportunity to see them celebrating the birthday of another guest who was also checking in that afternoon.

For a 4-star hotel, Casa del Mar projects all the traits expected of a 5-star establishment. Staff was chirpy and helpful, and I always love hotels that make the effort to remember your name. I was given a tour of the facilities close to the lobby before being taken to my room, and even there, Enlyn patiently went through practically every amenity in the room with me.

THE ROOM

My seaview room was on the second floor of the main building, which includes a balcony with deck chairs, beach umbrella and drying rack. Pleasantly decorated, the spacious room was fully-furnished with all the necessaries such as free Wi-Fi, safe, bathrobes, slippers, and TV (with movie DVDs available at front desk). Extra perks—which are very much appreciated—include a coffee machine, complimentary fruits/ biscuits/ peanuts, and even bath salts. The king-sized bed was super comfy with four pillows at your disposal.

THE POOL

There are actually tons of things one can do in Langkawi and the hotel actually provides guests upon arrival with an extensive list of payable activities available ranging from island hopping to jungle trekking, jet skiing to yacht dinner cruises. Alas, I was only there to chill and the Casa del Mar pool already had me at hello.

With beach towels readily available in your room, the captivating pool was where I spent most of my time and, more often than not, I had it all to myself including the jacuzzi. (Which is why it is always good to travel during off-peak periods and during weekdays!) Pool service was also quite exquisite – as long as you are on a sun lounger, staff will periodically serve you iced water or fruits. A really lovely touch.

THE BEACH AND OCEAN VIEWS

A big draw of Casa del Mar is the fact that it is located right on the popular Pantai Cenang beach, which is the longest and most popular beach in Langkawi. The beachfront views here are breathtaking – picturesque clean white sands, clear blue skies, and warm blue seas. It was also cool that the area facing the resort is considered private and hardly crowded with people though there are still some activities as the beach is a watersports haven.

The sandy stretch on the right of Casa del Mar’s beachfront is also considered private, so really, if you laze at the hotel’s sun lounges, what you get is beautifully unblocked scenic views with cool breezes keeping you cool even when under a blazing hot sun. If I was not at the pool, I would just park myself for a good long time on a sun lounger that faces the amazing beach expanse.

BREAKFAST

My friend told me that the food at Casa del Mar was good and she wasn’t wrong. Complimentary breakfast came with the room and though the buffet selection wasn’t extensive—understandably as the hotel only has 34 guestrooms—it has the usual suspects of breads, cereals, sandwiches, cheeses, and a local favorite that is nasi lemak (Malay fragrant rice dish). Add to that, each guest can choose an item from the a la carte menu such as omelette or pancakes and it will be served a la minute to you. Cool, that.

Breakfast and lunch, provided by the hotel’s La Sal Restaurant, are served outdoors albeit under shade. Luckily, the heat during my stay was bearable and it’s tad cooler if you chose a table along the wall-length water feature. The restaurant prides itself in producing “homemade” items including a variety of breads, pastries, and an incredible range of jams including pineapple, watermelon and chocolate hazel! And yes, I tried all the jams as you can see in the previous photo. 🙂

LUNCH

On arrival, I was in time for lunch but as I browsed the menu, an afternoon tea for two caught my eye. When I asked if I can have just a set for a single person, the waitress Adila said certainly and it was charged at half the price of the original set. Which was simply brilliant, as you can see above. Love it when establishments are willing to be flexible.

Dinner & Sunset Watch

If you are into sunsets, La Sal at Casa del Mar is actually one of the best places in Langkawi to catch one. For dinner, the restaurant set up their tables right up to the edge of the beach and guests will have a bird-eye’s view of the sun setting. Early reservations have to be made though, even for live-in guests, as tables are limited. (Walk-ins are welcome only if seating permits.)

So, even though one can find cheaper food fare elsewhere in Pantai Cenang—and there are loads of alternatives from burger joints to Chinese-style seafood restaurants throughout the town as well as along the beach—I opted to have dinner at La Sal on both the nights I was there as it provided me not only with a great view of the sun setting over the horizon, but also of people having fun either on the beach or paragliding in the air as dusk falls. And oh yes, the food was good too. As was the grog from the pool bar (especially the free beer courtesy of the management on Tuesday nights!)

The Spa

Almost forgot: If you are on a chill trip, not only the resort should have a good pool, it also should have a good spa. Housed on the second floor in a secluded wing of Casa del Mar (in the midst of guestrooms), Satkara Spa may be small, but it nonetheless offers a good range of treatments and therapies. I chose a massage-and-facial combo which they kindly allowed me to split into two one-hour sessions on separate days (as I rather spent most of daylight time at the pool). The treatment rooms were cosy and relaxing, and the therapists top-notch. Best to make reservations early if you plan to spend time here.

HOME BY THE SEA, GREAT PLACE TO CHILL

The unique “Clean My Room” door sign at Casa del Mar.
The eyes are closed for “Do Not Disturb”.

All in all, I had an absolute great time at Casa del Mar. Kinda regretted not staying longer. For its brilliant service, facilities and location, it was definitely worth the price. Would definitely patronise it again if finances permit!

Casa del Mar Langkawi is at Jalan Pantai Cenang, Mukim Kedawang, 07000 Langkawi, Kedah, Malaysia.

Langkawi: Sun, Sand & Sea @ Pantai Cenang

All Photos by Marguerita Tan

When in Langkawi: If you are into sun, sand and sea, the offshore island(s) district of Kedah, Malaysia will be right up your alley. Located off the northwestern coast of West Malaysia, the 99-island archipelago is well known for its many great beaches, of which Pantai Cenang is one of the most popular especially for swimming and water sports.

I personally am a lounge-by-the-pool lizard myself but if a holiday resort has great access to a nice beach, I’m all for it. It was thus why I opted for Casa del Mar which is strategically located at a relatively quiet section of the 2km-long Pantai Cenang, said to be the longest beach in Langkawi.

One of things I loved doing during my stay was walking up and down the pristine beach via a cosy boardwalk that seemingly starts from Casa del Mar, all the way southwards to a spot where you will find the rainbow-colored “Pantai Chenang” sign (see main picture) and where the beach is arguably at its most crowded.

Views From A Boardwalk

Clean white sands, clear blue sky, warm sea, and idyllic islands on the horizon – that will be the first things that take your breath away on Pantai Cenang. Even if not on the private beaches of the fancier resorts, the elements are still wonderful sights to behold.

Walking along the stretch also allows you to check out the other beach accommodations available, many of which are rustic chalets such as this…

…and there were even beachfront tree houses such as this cool one here! There are also resorts which have swimming pools right alongside the beach.

Food and drink outlets are in abundance in Pantai Cenang too – along the beach, such as the popular Kalut Bar, and especially along the main road of Jalan Pantai Cenang.

Needless to say, al fresco wining and dining is very popular on the beach (as long as you don’t dirty the surroundings)…

Water sports is also very big here – you can go jet skiing, paragliding, kayaking, sailing on a banana or longboat, or even parasailing on a “flying machine”. It’s fun just to watch brave souls taking to the skies in various contraptions.

Colorful jet skis of various shapes and sizes can be seen parked, as well as in action, up and down the beach.

Loads of boats too… including signs to please “keep clean our island”. And I have to say, Pantai Cenang is one of the cleanest beaches I’ve ever been to in all my travels.

As mentioned, you will find food and drink options aplenty up and down the beach, with signs to direct you if you aren’t quite sure of where to go…

Random beach bars and “discos” do pop up on the sands which is really cool…

There is even an artistic compound, complete with cool graffiti art and tree swing…

Last but by no means least, Pantai Cenang is a great place to catch sunsets. Many people would gather around the Pantai Chenang sign—it’s directly opposite Cenang Mal—and just catch the sunset every evening (usually between 7.15-7.40pm). Or you can watch it while having dinner at any of the eateries or bars along the stretch.

There are actually lots more things one can do in Langkawi, but if you are happy with just sun, sand and sea, Pantai Cenang is one beach worth visiting once in your lifetime.

Langkawi: Sunset Over Pantai Cenang Beach

Photo by Marguerita Tan

When in Langkawi: Sunsets in the Malaysian 99-island archipelago are usually between 7.20pm and 7.45pm. In end July, it’s roughly 7.35-7.40pm and if you are on the western shoreline of the island district of Kedah, the best spot to catch one in full glory is to seat yourself anywhere along the 2km pristine white sands of Pantai Cenang beach.

I knew staying at the Casa del Mar Langkawi resort would plonk me right in the midst of the popular beach, but I didn’t realised that the hotel restaurant La Sal actually placed their al fresco dinner tables right by the edge of the sands so that guests—if they are seated at the right time⁠—will be able to enjoy the full course of the sun setting over one of Langkawi’s mini islands on the horizon.

So, as I sipped my chilled pre-dinner beer, it was blissfully joyful to watch the sun lighting the clear blue sky, from glaring whitish gold to a lovely golden-orange yellow hue, as it slowly disappeared behind the island on the horizon.

Definitely one of my favorite sunset watch in recent times…

Photo by Marguerita Tan